The Atlantic Meridional Transect (AMT) programme (www.amt-uk.org) began in 1995, utilising the passage of the RRS James Clark Ross through the Atlantic Ocean between the UK and the Falkland Islands (50°N to 52°S, a distance of over 13,500 km) southwards in September and northwards in April each year. The transect crosses a range of ecosystems from sub-polar to tropical, and from eutrophic shelf seas and upwelling systems to oligotrophic mid-ocean gyres.Since 2008, a POGO-PML fellowship has placed a trainee on board the AMT cruise, providing a hands-on, sea-going experience to young scientists from developing countries, and the opportunity to be involved in an internationally renowned scientific programme. This fellowship programme is open to scientists, technicians, postgraduate students (PhD/MSc) and post-doctoral fellows involved in oceanographic work at centres in developing countries and countries with economies in transition.The selected candidate has the opportunity to visit Plymouth Marine Laboratory (PML) for one month prior to the start of the cruise to participate in cruise preparation and planning; to go on the cruise and help make hydrological, bio-optical and ecological observations; and after the cruise to spend one additional month at PML, learning to analyse the results statistically and interpret them.
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